Discover more than 3 million Google eBooks from your choice of booksellers and devices

Monday, December 6, 2010 | 7:01 AM

Cross-posted from the Official Google Blog

Today is the first page in a new chapter of our mission to improve access to the cultural and educational treasures we know as books. Google eBooks will be available in the U.S. from a new Google eBookstore. You can browse and search through the largest ebooks collection in the world with more than three million titles including hundreds of thousands for sale. Find the latest bestsellers like James Patterson’s Cross Fire and Jonathan Franzen’s Freedom, dig into popular reads like Laura Hillenbrand’s Unbroken and catch up on the classics like Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities and Gulliver’s Travels.




We designed Google eBooks to be open. Many devices are compatible with Google eBooks—everything from laptops to netbooks to tablets to smartphones to e-readers. With the new Google eBooks Web Reader, you can buy, store and read Google eBooks in the cloud. That means you can access your ebooks like you would messages in Gmail or photos in Picasa—using a free, password-protected Google account with unlimited ebooks storage.

In addition to a full-featured web reader, free apps for Android and Apple devices will make it possible to shop and read on the go. For many books you can select which font, font size, day/night reading mode and line spacing suits you—and pick up on the page where you left off when switching devices.

You can discover and buy new ebooks from the Google eBookstore or get them from one of our independent bookseller partners: Powell’s, Alibris and participating members of the American Booksellers Association. You can choose where to buy your ebooks like you choose where to buy your print books, and keep them all on the same bookshelf regardless of where you got them.

When Google Books first launched in 2004, we set out to make the information stored in the world’s books accessible and useful online. Since then, we’ve digitized more than 15 million books from more than 35,000 publishers, more than 40 libraries, and more than 100 countries in more than 400 languages. This deep repository of knowledge and culture will continue to be searchable through Google Books search in the research section alongside the ebookstore.


Launching Google eBooks is an initial step toward giving you greater access to the vast variety of information and entertainment found in books. Our journey has just begun. We welcome your feedback as we read on to the next chapter.



19 comments:

CQWagner said...

The video is currently private.

e42 said...

And the link to the Android app doesn't work (and neither does the barcdode).

Ben said...

...and the link to the iPad app leads to a rather discouraging message: "Not available in the US store".

Jeremy Bean said...

I think the twitter crew jumped the gun a bit. :) But looking forward to seeing how this competes with Amazon/B&N!

DuDe said...

please repost with correct video, and app links...!

Joe said...

So how come I can't find the "The Virginian" by Owen Wister? Gutenberg.org has had it for ages.

Books.google.com has lots of editions of this book you can pay for but Gutenberg.org isn't on your list of partners there either.

Please add Gutenberg.org to your partners and include their books in your search resilts.

Carlos said...

The video is private

Cassio Rogerio said...

Don't support the most user e-reader( Kindle ) is a #Mega #Epic #Fail.

Florian Rohrweck said...

Android link worked for me using Marketenabler

Charles Indelicato said...

Similar to Ben's comment, iTunes reports iPhone app "Not available in the US store".

Antonio M. Moreiras said...

Very nice. But why to work only in US? Why not an international store?

Larry F said...

@Cassio Rogerio

The fact that Amazon uses a proprietary format that no other eReader uses is a #Mega #Epic #Fail.

Xero said...

1. I'm not comfortable with the Google Checkout account being tied to my main Google account with no other security measure, not even a security code or pin number between a hacker who gained access to my email account, account and my credit card number.

2. If that is not an option then you need to make one time purchases an option, that allows me to pay for the items in my (missing) shopping cart without you storing my credit card number.

3. The site needs a shopping cart for multiple purchases, how can such a simple thing be missing from an ecommerce site launched in 2010?

SprintDroid Blogger said...

@Cassio Rogerio
The Kindle snub is not a Google issue... it's an Amazon issue. they refuse to let anyone else use their proprietary format. Most others use EPUB or PDF formats for ebooks.

@Xero
Works exactly like Android Market does. Nobody complains about that. Even Apple's iTunes Store (and App Store) work identically... your payment info is tied to your Apple ID.

SprintDroid Blogger said...

It will be interesting to see whether Google eBooks does appear on the iOS App Store... as of right now, it doesn't, but Apple takes its time with approvals.

e42 said...

Xero has an extremely good point! The security of access to my bank account / credit card should not on the same level as security of my Google Account credentials which I am forced to provide to third parties from time to time. There must be another security layer for Google Checkout to make it useful. I guard my PayPal credentials much more diligently then my Google Account login info and I want to be able to do the same for my Google Checkout credentials. Having it directly tied to the Google Account is just very bad security manners.

Spindel said...

No Windows Phone 7 app?

lijie said...

No BlackBerry app?

Mark Shaw said...

Links to the Android reader are borken. Bah.