Google Product Search for Android now with Barcode Scanning

Thursday, May 14, 2009 | 9:55 AM

Since we launched Google Product Search for mobile a few weeks ago, I've been using it to check prices, reviews and product details on my Android phone. In addition to typing in my product searches, I've also had some fun speaking them. Sometimes, though, when I'm looking up a specific item in a store rather than a category of products (like "bluetooth headsets"), I'd rather just scan a barcode to see results for the exact product I'm searching for. That's why we've integrated barcode scanning with Google Product Search for mobile.

Here's how to get started. First, visit the Google Product Search for mobile homepage by going to Google.com in your browser and selecting 'Shopping' from the 'more' tab. Next, tap on the 'Scan Barcode' button to install the latest version of the Barcode Scanner app -- if you don't already have it -- from Android Market.

After you've installed the application, go back to Product Search in your browser and tap on the 'Scan Barcode' button again. Select "Use by default for this action" and tap on the Barcode Scanner option. After the app opens, center the red line over the barcode and hold the phone steady. When the barcode is read successfully, you'll see a Google Product Search results page back in the browser.

You can also access the scanner directly from the top of the Product Search results page by tapping on the barcode button.

Today, barcode scanning works best for products like electronics, books, movies or video games, but we're working on adding more barcodes for other items. Of course, if your scan does not return a result, you can always type in the product name just as before.

The integration of Barcode Scanner and Product Search for mobile is available in the US and UK, for Android-powered devices.

13 comments:

Edward said...

This app should have nipples, cuz it's tits. WTG google!

lmjabreu said...

Lemme guess, US only, 'cos I don't see that option even after changing my location to United States at m.google.com, gg.

|[ j o s h ]| said...

Will support for WebOS and the Palm Pre be added since the Pre's camera has the extended depth of field enabling close up pictures (for barcodes)?

streetstylz said...

NeoMedia Technologies grandfathered this technology back in the mid 90’s and have been doing mobile code scanning and comparison shopping via barcodes long before any other company in this space.

NeoMedia on ABC & NBC News circa 2004:
http://www.qode.com/videos/PaperClickOnAbc7.wmv
http://www.qode.com/videos/PaperClickOnNbc8.wmv

NeoMedia has a rich patent portfolio that covers scanning barcodes with a camera enabled mobile device to connect to the Internet, comparison shop, and/or retrieve online content.

http://www.qode.com/en/patents.jsp

kai said...

NeoMedia,
consumers don't care about whether you have 1 mil. patents or not.

streetstylz said...

kai,

Consumers may not care, but Google does. Only question is ... Will they license the easy way, or the hard way?

:-)

Alexander Muse said...

Kudos Google! I think this really showcases the power of Android and its ability to combine the power of the web and mobile applications. This sort of synergy is missing from iPhone applications.

Our latest version of ShopSavvy listens for the barcode intent and offers the user the option of using ShopSavvy. More on our use of the intent here: http://digg.com/u13LKs

Me said...

The Calorie Counter by FatSecret android app has had (food) product scanning for nearly 6 months. It is truly unbelievable and I'd recommend others try and follow their lead.

mhall said...

will this constitute patent infringement on NeoMedia intellectual property?

andreas.wpv said...

Similar to what we did at www.tuvdotcom.com for products. We certified products (safety) and then gave them a sticker. Sticker hat a 10 digit number and with this you could WAP or check online for product, properties and safety.

Clive Jefferies said...

Cool.

Mike said...

streetstylz,

I've looked at some of neomedia's patents and even though IANAL it seems like they don't pass the obviousness test. Maybe they should focus more on quality patents as opposed to thinly veiled patent trolling?

streetstylz said...

Mike,

I suggest you read this in it's entirety:

http://www.barkume.com/Site/IP_News/Entries/2009/2/25_CASE_STUDY_-_REEXAMINATION_OF_US_PATENT_NO._6%2C199%2C048.html

:-)